Are Herbs Good for the Skin

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It’s no secret that a way to get healthier skin is to eat healthy food. Sometimes, however, the path to healthier skin can be found in the most unexpected places. Certain healthy herbs are normally used for something else, like cooking or making things smell good, but some of them, when used in very special ways, can do wonders for your skin.

Today, we’ll be taking a look at some of the best herbs good for skin and how you can use to look your best.

What Counts as an Herb?

Before we begin our list, let’s first take a look at what counts as an herb. Typically, herbs are plants that have parts, whether the leaves, seeds or flowers, that are used for their medicinal purposes, aromatic purposes or their flavor. By this definition, any plant can be classified as an herb, so long as parts of them are utilized. Even mushrooms and certain minerals can be considered herbs.

Cinnamon

The Theory

Cinnamon is rich in antioxidants. As a matter of fact, it has as much antioxidants as half a cup of blueberries. These antioxidants help eliminate free radicals that ruin your skin and could even help reverse the damage done to you.

How to Use

Cinnamon is most effective when consumed as normal. You can pretty much mix it with any drink or food and enjoy the benefits they bring. Sprinkle half a teaspoon of this spice to a cup of coffee, or you can even add it to your favorite cereal for breakfast. Cinnamon is most effective when it is fresh, so avoid using it if the bottle you keep it in is more than two years old. Make sure you store cinnamon somewhere dark and cool to maintain their freshness.

Rose Petals

The Theory

Rose petals have long since been used throughout history for their healing properties on the skin. They’re a healthy herb that works as an antiseptic, astringent and for its rejuvenating properties. When rose water is used, it can also help rejuvenate skin by hydrating it and help with its recovery.

How to Use

Take ¼ cup of dried rose petals and place them into a saucepan with 1 cup of water. Cover the saucepan and bring to a boil. You may then reduce the temperature and allow it to simmer until the color on the rose petals fade. Once the petals are completely faded, allow the solution to cool, then you and store them in sealed containers. The resulting rose water can be applied to your skin twice a day or as much as needed.

Lavander

The Theory

The flowers on the lavender can act as an astringent and antiseptic. It can also work as a toner and can rehydrate your skin. Lavender flowers are also herbs good for skin that suffer from certain conditions like psoriasis, eczema and severe acne breakouts, thanks to their antiseptic properties.

How to Use

Start by boiling water into a saucepan. Put 2 tablespoons of lavender into the saucepan and steep for about 30 minutes. You can use lavender buds or mature flowers. You can use the infusion by drinking it directly, apply it to certain foods, or you can soak a cotton ball in it and apply it directly to your skin at least twice a day.

Aloe Vera

The Theory

Aloe vera is well-known for its healing properties and is a healthy herb that can be used both on the skin and on your hair. Aloe vera works well when used on rashes, scars, insect bites and some wounds. If you’ve suffered from burns, the extract from aloe vera can also improve healing. It’s also good at rehydrating your skin.

How to Use

Simply cut up the aloe vera leaves and apply the recently cut parts of the leaf directly on the problem area on your skin. You can also extract the gel within the leaf and apply that to your skin or hair as well.

Basil

The Theory

More than just an herb to make your food smell great, basil is a healthy herb to use thanks to its antiseptic properties. You can use it over acne and insect bites to soothe your skin. It’s also an effective fungal treatment.

How to Use

Grind up basil leaves using a mortar and pestle until you have a paste. You can apply this paste on the problem areas of your skin. Leave them there for at least 30 minutes. You can also simply run the leaves on your skin, but the effectiveness will be much less compared to using paste.

Parsley

The Theory

Another heathy herb more commonly used in cooking, parsley actually has antiseptic properties, and is mildly astringent. It’s great for treating psoriasis, acne or eczema. It’s also rich in antioxidants, so consuming parsley on a regular basis can help clear your skin and is a good boost to your overall health.

How to Use

Parsley can be consumed directly by adding it to salads or juices, but it can also be turned into a paste using a mortar and pestle. Parsley paste can then be applied directly to your skin’s problem areas to help with its recovery.

Green Tea

The Theory

Green tea itself is rich in antioxidants, so consuming it on a regular basis can help improve your skin’s overall health. It’s also known to have anti-aging effect on your skin. When green tea extract is applied to your skin, it’s also known to help even out an uneven skin tone, making it perfect for people suffering from hyperpigmentation.

How to Use

You can steep green tea for at least 15 minutes in hot water and drink it like normal, and you’d be able to enjoy many of its health effects. For further benefits, save the tea bag and let it cool. You can then rub the used tea bag directly on your skin. Make sure to use a tea bag only once, since it will lose its effectiveness when used multiple times.

Dandelion

The Theory

Dandelion root actually has a lot of health benefits. The tea made from the root can help purify your liver and can also heal your skin from the inside out. Drinking dandelion root tea on a regular basis is a known treatment for severe acne, eczema and psoriasis.

How to Use

Start by putting a pot over medium heat and putting dried dandelion roots into it. Allow the roots to toast until they turn golden brown and fragrant. You can then add water and bring it to a boil. You can also add sugar or honey at this point if you want. Once the water boils, lower the heat and allow the concoction to simmer for about 30 – 45 minutes. You may then strain and serve to your liking.

Rosemary

The Theory

The leaves from the rosemary herb is known to have antiseptic properties, making it great for cleaning acne and can be used as an astringent. It’s also rich in antioxidants, so consuming rosemary on a regular basis can also boost your skin health. The antioxidants can also work as an excellent anti-aging treatment.

How to Use

You can eat rosemary directly or put it on any dish and still be able to feel the benefits this healthy herb would bring. You can also turn it into a paste and apply it to the problem spots on your skin. Do this twice a day or as much as desired for best results.

Chickweed

The Theory

A very common weed found all over the world, chickweed actually has strong ant-inflammatory properties. It also works great as an antiseptic and astringent. Chickweed has been used to treat skin conditions from eczema, psoriasis and rashes to help speed up the healing process with wounds, acne and insect bites.

How to Use

You can grind up chickweed into a poultice and use it as a salve over your skin, but you can also infuse it to your bath water. Simply steep the weeds in hot water for at least 30 minutes before applying directly to your skin. Make sure you let it cool down first though.

Chamomile

The Theory

Although more popularly drank as a tea, chamomile extract can actually help soothe your skin when it’s irritated. This is all thanks to its antiseptic and anti-inflammatory properties. It helps with treating acne, psoriasis and eczema. If you’re suffering from minor burns, cuts, scrapes, insect bites and acne, applying chamomile over the affected area can also help hasten the healing process.

How to Use

You can drink chamomile how it’s always been, as a tea. Simply steep the leaves into hot water for 30 – 45 minutes and drink normally. If you have access to their tea bag form, you can shorten the steeping process to 10 – 15 minutes. Aside from drinking it as per usual, you can also rub the used tea bag or leaves on any affected area on your skin. You can do this at least twice a day or as much as you want until you see results.

Kana Z

Kana Z

I am a writer focussing on beauty, cosmetics, skincare, haircare and body care. I have a special interest in establishing solutions for problem skin. I have being working and studing with some of the world’s top skincare experts, hairstylists, makeup artists, perfume creators, photographers and models. I also currently write for websites of the skincare brand. My Specialties: beauty, journalism, skincare, haircare, cosmetics and problem skin.

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